Dewey and Margaret Bradford

 

Dewey and Margaret Bradford

Dewey and Margaret Bradford

Both Clarence Dewey Bradford and Margaret E. Castleberry were born in Rising Fawn, Georgia. Doctor O. S. Middleton delivered Dewey on August 20, 1915, (number thirteen) to Lott and Sarah Alien Bradford who lived in Johnson Crook.

Then on August 19, 1917, he delivered Margaret to Troop and Josie Brown Castleberry who lived on Julie Brannon Hill where the Walter Wilson home still stands.

Just before Margaret’s sixth birthday her family moved to the Bessemer, Alabama area where her father was employed by the Tennessee Coal, Iron and Railroad Company.

Years later, in 1937, Dewey went to the same area. Since his relatives and her parents had been life long friends, it isn’t surprising that they met. Dewey went to work at a galvanizing plant, while Margaret was employed at the Tin Mill, a division of T.C.I.

November 25, 1939, these two were married at the home of her parents. A few months later they purchased their first home below Bessemer, out in the country. While living there their first son, Dewey Wayne, was born August 26, 194O.

Later they bought a second home in Bessemer, near Dewey’s work. There, Robert Dion, their second son, was born August 18, 1942.

Some Dade County friends visited them there, lamenting the fact there was no barber in the village of Rising Fawn. Since Dewey was licensed, enjoyed barbering, as well as desiring his own business, they packed up and came “back home” in August 1946. Shortly after moving he opened Bradford’s Barber Shop on Highway Eleven.

They bought their house on the hill above Rising Fawn in the edge of the woods at the foot of Fox Mountain – the coolest and best place of all. There they still live-happy and enjoying their retirement years.

Other than barbering, Dewey engaged in several trades and handy man jobs. He drove a school bus for twelve years, did plumbing, carpentry, wiring, worked for a gas company, installed well pumps, worked on building several sections of interstate highways in Dade and other counties.

Margaret taught school at Rising Fawn Elementary on an emergency license, starting in 1949 for $67.50 a twenty day month. She taught regularly for several years, then as a substitute for more years. She still claims each child she taught as “special” to her. Some are now parents, grandparents, maybe even great grands so that makes her rich indeed.

She also served as substitute clerk at the Rising Fawn Post Office for twenty two years. She retired from there in 1972. She worked most of those years with Mr. J. L. Fricks as postmaster and Cora Pangle McMahan as clerk. She thoroughly enjoyed these years.

Both sons finished grammar school in 1954 and high school (Dade High, at that time) in 1958. Dion went to Jacksonville, Alabama, to college the first of September, 1958. Wayne left for a tour of duty in the U.S. Marine Corps, September 17, 1958. He spent twenty two months in the Philippine Islands. He served for four years.

While in high school he worked at Shoprite, a new grocery store. After returning to civilian life in 1962, he went to work at the DuPont Plant in Chattanooga. He worked there until his death in August, 1982.

Wayne married Anita Fugate of Evensville, Tennessee, in 1966, she was and is still an employee of DuPont. The couple had no children but shared their home with two nephews and a niece of Anita’s.

Dewey and Margaret have one grandchild, Bruce Dion Bradford. His family story of Dion, Linda and Bruce is given separately.

Written by Margaret C. Bradford Rising Fawn, Georgia 30738




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