CASE HONORED AS “CITIZEN OF THE MONTH”

 

Jules A. Case of Trenton was honored last Tuesday night by the Dade County Lions Club as “Citizen of the Month.”  Tribute was paid the business, church and civic leader during a dinner meeting of the club at Wright’s Restaurant.

 

A.L. Dyer read the following acknowledgement of Mr. Case’s outstanding service and contributions to the Dade Community

 

“It is my pleasure and privilege tonight to show respect and to honor one of our own.

 

“Jules A.Case was born on Christmas Day, 1902, in Trenton, one block from his present home. He Attended school through the ninth grade in the old Masonic building, and attended Chattanooga High School from 1917 to 1920. Then he decided he was ready for the world.

 

“He started working in 1920 for George K. Brown Co., Chattanooga, stayed until 1926 and had worked up to plant superintendent . The Brown Co. had operated the old ‘Palace Cream Parlor’ which during the ‘wild ‘20’s was a favorite meeting place for the younger sect.

 

“His next stop was at Swift Gold Co. also in Chattanooga over 10 years, and he worked from shipping clerk to assistant manager. He stayed in Nashville for eight years as branch manager, then transferred to Savannah as manager there for about two years.

 

.”Then he went into business for himself in Statesboro, Ga., for about a year, operating a meat packing company there. Then he moved back to Trenton in 1946.

 

“While in Nashville, he was a member of the Kiwanis Club and Chamber of Commerce, also belonging to the Kiwanis Club in Savannah.

 

“Mr. Case has a daughter, Mrs. Robert Ingle of Chattanooga, and she has a boy and girl in college and a younger son attending Baylor School. Mr. Case and Thelma, his wife, have two boys, John, who is married, the father of a 3-year-old son, lives on Sand Mountain, works for the telephone company, and Bruce, the younger son, who lives in knoxville and is still single. I’m sure most of you know both Bruce and John.

 

“I have known Mr. Case during the part of his life since he moved back to Trenton in 1946, and am sure some of you have known him as long as I have. He has been a faithful member of the Methodist Church since he moved back here, and still serves on the administrative board. He was Church treasurer for many years and never seemed to have any trouble getting what money the church needed. I am glad to be able to say that he is still a regular attendant every Sunday.

 

“Mr. Case has served on the Tax Board for Dade County, and for several years was a councilman for the City of Trenton. He has been a member of the Lions Club since moving back until a few years ago when he resigned. He served as president one year. During the years, he worked on all kinds of projects for the Lions Club, and was a member you could always count on.

 

“He served as president of the Dade County Forestry Club, the first year it was organized. He was on the Board of Directors of the Bank of Dade from the beginning in 1956 until January of this year. He was Chairman of the Board during the last year, resigning in January of this year. He served several years on the Dade Development Board and played a big part in getting Lee Corporation to move here.

 

“Along with Bill Tatum, Mr. Case developed the Trenton Telephone Co. from a small operation of about 125 phones to about 4,000 at the present time. Along with the late Maddox Hale and myself, Mr. Case helped develop the Mountain View Subdivision and also the Stevenson property south of Trenton. He was also instrumental in getting a doctor here about 20 years ago, when we were in worse shape in that way than we are now.

 

“Now that the years have come along and he is in semi-retirement, I am sure he will devote much time to two things that he enjoys much, golf and traveling.

 

“I think we become so accustomed to the people around us that we don’t realize all they do and stand for…One more comment I must make: You will notice he always went up and ended at the top…”(Used by permission, HISTORY OF DADE COUNTY, GEORGIA, Retired Senior Volunteer Program, 1981)




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