RAYMOND M. MORRISON

 

Raymond was born on April 12, 1899, in New England, in what was later known as the “Raulston House,” which burned in 1971. He was the fifth son of W.G. (Bud) Morrison, Sr. and Allie H. Brock Morrison, and had eight brothers and three sisters.

 

He descended from four prominent, early-settler, Dade County Families – Morrison, Pace, Brock and Taylor.

 

His Grandfather Morrison, along with two brothers, migrated to Dade County from Morrison, Tennessee, and settled in Slygo Valley on what is known as the Joe Doyle farm. Grandfather Morrison married Harriett Pace and moved from Slygo to New England where Raymond’s father was born in 1852.

 

Raymond’s mother was the daughter of Dr. W. E. Brock who organized the first company of soldiers from Dade County in the Civil War. Dr. Brock’s father, Benjamin Brock, migrated from North Carolina on the same wagon train with the Pace family and settled east of Trenton on the farm now owned by James C. Vice.

 

Raymond’s grandmother, Nancy Taylor Brock, was the daughter of Lawson Taylor, whose home place is now the Robert Forester home in New England. Grandmother Brock was the winner of a contest among the young ladies of the Presbyterian Church, which was the first church in Trenton, for raising the most money to pay for the church bell. This bell was shipped from England and is the same bell now used in the steeple of the Trenton United Methodist Church.

 

Raymond’s father operated ore mines in the ridges northeast of New England, and the rail switch that served these mines was known as the Morrison Switch.

 

Raymond attended school at New England, Piney Grove, Ridgedale (in Chatta.), and in Trenton where he was graduated in the first graduating class at Trenton High School in the Class of 1915 which consisted of three persons. The other two members of the class were Jacob Ewing Sells and Robert Hicks Thurman.

 

Raymond worked on his father’s farm until about 1925 when he went to Birmingham to work for a period of three years in the steel mills of T. C. & I. Co. On June 17, 1928, he was married to Olivine Tate, daughter of Reverend and Mrs. W. L. Tate, in Jasper, Tennessee. They became parents of two children, Raymond, Jr. and Kathleen (Mrs. Richard E. Lord), and five grandchildren. All live in Atlanta.

 

Shortly, after Raymond was married, he returned to Dade County in 1929 to run successfully for the unexpired term of Mr. A. B., Frierson, Clerk of Superior Court, which office he served for eleven years.

 

In 1940 he resigned his office as Clerk of the court to accept appointment as rural mail carrier on Route 1, Trenton, which was later combined with the Wildwood Route.

 

After serving the community in this capacity for six years, he accepted appointment as Acting Postmaster in Trenton, which position he served until 1948 when he resigned to  `offer his hat’ in the primary election for the office of Ordinary.

 

Raymond was defeated in the primary election, but came back with more vigor to defeat his opponent in the general election for a full four-year term in the office of Ordinary.

 

While serving the people of Dade County as Ordinary, Raymond obtained the first paved roads under the Rural Roads Authority, all of which were badly needed.

 

Raymond served on the Board of Boy Scouts several terms when the troop was first organized. He served for a time as Chairman of the Dade County Democratic Executive Committee; he has been involved in sports, and was manager of a baseball team for a                   period of time.

 

While Raymond was Clerk of Court, in the middle of the Depression, Mr. George H. Harrison, who later organized the Bank of Dade, was the Federal Representative for the Seed, Feed and Fertilizer Loan Association which made loans to farmers. Mr. Harrison asked Raymond to name two other persons to serve with him on a loan approval committee which he did.” 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                             

Mr. Harrison told many years later (after the bank was organized) that the government did not lose a penny on loans approved by this committee. Also during the Depression years, Raymond was treasurer of a committee of Red Cross which issued several thousand dollars of food to local people in great need, along with a box car load of flour.

 

Raymond was for a time a member of this organization and although he was not one of its charter members, the Lions’ representative who organized the new club used Raymond’s office as his base of operations and was furnished by Raymond a list of names from which the charter members came. Only after seeing that there were enough members for the charter, and because money was a little short during those Depression years, did Raymond decide not to become a charter member.”

 

Raymond is a member of the Trenton United Methodist Church. He has been a member of Trenton Masonic Lodge No. 179 since 1921. His grandfather Brock was a charter member of the lodge.

 

Raymond worked for the Bank of Dade first as Cashier and then as Vice President, from January 1957, until he retired December 31, 1972.

 

Raymond Morrison served the people of Dade County for a total of 42 years from January, 1930, until December, 1972. During these many years, his life and his service touched, in meaningful ways, the lives of Dade Countians.

 

In their times of need; in their times of loss and sorrow, and in their times of joy and happiness, he was there to serve the needs of all.(Used by permission, HISTORY OF DADE COUNTY, GEORGIA, Retired Senior Volunteer Program, 1981)

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